Paper accepted to UIST 2019

Author 
taodu

Alex's latest work Knitting Skeletons: A Computer-Aided Design Tool for Shaping and Patterning of Knitted Garments is officially accepted to UIST 2019. In this paper, Alex and Liane present a novel interactive system for simple garment composition and surface patterning. Both casual users and advanced users can benefit from their system. Check out these beautiful samples to explore the new possibility brought by their tool!

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04/02/2020
Paper accepted to Physical Review Letters

The paper Physical Realization Of Elastic Cloaking With A Polar Material was recently accepted to Physical Review Letters (PRL). In this paper, Wan Shou and Beichen Li collaborated with researchers at University of Missouri and Dalian University of Technology to propose a novel elastic cloak by designing and fabricating a new class of polar materials with a distribution of body torque that exhibits asymmetric stresses. The work sets a precedent in the field of transformation elasticity and should find applications in mechanical stress shielding and stealth technologies. Check out their paper to learn more about this breakthrough in material science!

07/14/2019
One paper accepted to Science Advances

In our latest work published in Science Advances, our group presented an automated system that designs and 3-D prints complex robotic actuators which are optimized according to an enormous number of specifications. We demonstrate the system by fabricating actuators that show different black-and-white images at different angles. One of our actuators portrays a Vincent van Gogh portrait when laid flat and the famous Edvard Munch painting “The Scream” when tiled an angle. We also 3-D printed floating water lilies with petals equipped with arrays of actuators and hinges that fold up in response to magnetic fields run through conductive fluids.

The research paper Topology optimization and 3D printing of multimaterial magnetic actuators and displays was published in Science Advances last Friday, and MIT News covered our story on the same day.